The Mode-Coupling Theory of supercooled liquids: Does it wear any clothes?

Posted in Journal Articles on June 22, 2010 at 9:42 pm by JCCMP

1. Glass transition of hard spheres in high dimensions
Authors: Bernhard Schmid, Rolf Schilling
arXiv:1003.4559; Phys. Rev. E 81, 041502 (2010)

2. Mode-Coupling Theory as a Mean-Field Description of the Glass Transition
Authors: Atsushi Ikeda, Kunimasa Miyazaki
arXiv:1003.5472

3. A critical test of the mode-coupling theory of the glass transition
Authors: Ludovic Berthier, Gilles Tarjus
arXiv:1005.0914

Recommended with a commentary by Jean-Philippe Bouchaud, CFM, Paris | View Commentary (pdf) |

JCCM_JUNE2010_01

3 responses on “The Mode-Coupling Theory of supercooled liquids: Does it wear any clothes?”

  1. MILLEV says:

    Re: your # 2 paper ->
    The Letter by Ikeda & Miyazaki has just been published on 25 June 2010:

    Mode-Coupling Theory as a Mean-Field Description of the Glass Transition
    Atsushi Ikeda and Kunimasa Miyazaki
    Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 255704 (2010)

    Best,
    Yonko Millev

  2. MILLEV says:

    Paper #2 by Ikeda & Miyazaki has been accepted in PRL:

    Mode-coupling theory as a mean-field description of the glass transition
    Atsushi Ikeda and Kunimasa Miyazaki
    Accepted Tuesday Jun 01, 2010

    http://prl.aps.org/accepted

    It will appear in early July 2009.

    Best,

    Yonko Millev

  3. MILLEV says:

    Paper #1, ” Glass transition of hard spheres in high dimensions” by Schmid & Schillig, has been published in Physical Review E:

    Phys. Rev. E 81, 041502 (2010).

    Best,
    Yonko Millev

Guidelines for Comments by Members:
Members are invited to comment on the chosen papers and refer only to papers intimately related to the papers selected. Other comments and suggestions can be transmitted to the organizers through the 'Guest book' link. These comments will be put on the web-site and the archives so that they can be read by other members. Just as in the Guidelines to the Corresponding Members, we suggest that the comments be confined to substantive issues of science and in order to illuminate the subject matter. A collegial and respectful tone is suggested. Issues of priority should not be raised in the comments.

Leave Your Comment Below

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

google

google